Improving the rhetoric of rationing, pt. 1

From the Health Affairs Blog:

Note: Rationing of health care services is a contentious topic and in our view, current discussions of rationing often are unproductive or harmful. We suggest two reasons for that result. First the discussants are imprecise in their use of the term rationing – often for politically motivated reasons. Second, the discussants write about rationing as an activity that “we” will undertake, with significant consequences for “you.” It would be more helpful to discuss the prudent use of health care services in terms of the health plan that we would want for ourselves and our families. 

In part 1 of this post below, we address the first problem by offering a more precise definition of rationing. In part 2 of this post [which will appear on Health AffairsBlog tomorrow], we address the second problem by describing the type of health plan we would like for ourselves and our families.

“Rationing,” and particularly “government rationing” is politically charged rhetoric. Merely mentioning the possibility of government rationing of health care services has a chilling effect on health policy debates. For example, some of the early criticisms of comparative effectiveness research (CER) were based on the possibility that the research would be used as a basis for coverage decisions in public insurance plans, especially Medicare.

Read the complete post here.

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